Index

The life-giving, political, and economic components of our „animated waters“ (Vernadsky 1933, Margulis 1990) exemplify a pressing melancholy of our position as a human species. Spatially and temporally: as holobionts, as fluid beings, in our own bodies, in urban habitats, in the ecosystem, and in the Anthropocene.

This work draws from a stay at the river Schwärze and the bodily encounters occurring during this stay, which reflect the fluidity of water. Along the lifeline and contact zone between the forests of Brandenburg and the city of Berlin, the film immerses in wet ontologies (Gaard 2001, Steinberg & Peters 2015, Neimanis 2016) of multiple phenomena.


Capturing the essence and pains through analog photoprocesses, hydrotests, creative writing, and filmmaking.

Inspired by Nils Bubandt et al.’s “Rubberboot Methods for the Anthropocene,” I  immerse myself in the watery bodies and let my sensory apparatuses guide me. During this process, I allow ideas to naturally surface and take form. On the journey unexpectedly I am confronted with my physical vulnerability and my bodily fluids out of sync. This revelation broadens my perspective, leading me to consider the interconnected urbanized and inner human waters within the greater web of entanglements. 

Ideas for this work materialize through analog photographic techniques, including photograms and chemigrams, taken at the water’s edge as well as using scientific methods for hydro-probing and testing blending art and science in my exploration.

Excerpt by Astrida Neimanis and diary by me.

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2021

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2021

2021

This ecosexual wedding performance took place at the Great Salt Lake in 2021, near the iconic land art sculpture Spiral Jetty (1970) by Robert Smithson.The ceremony was graced by the presence of Annie Sprinkle and Beth Stephens who launched the ecosexual movement in art, and was carried out in collaboration with Bonnie Baxter and Jaimi Butler, the scientists from the Great Salt Lake Institute, Westminster College, in Salt Lake City. Joy Brooke Fairfield directed the wedding performance under the difficult circumstances of heat and drought the unique body of GSL water is now experiencing due to climate change.

Through this performance, humans were married to the tiny crustaceans the whole GLS ecosystem depends on. The brine shrimp brides were represented digitally through the Augmented Reality application Artemia designed to visualize these aquatic wildlife critters in contrast to modern science’s goals and consumer imagery of the Sea Monkeys, a commodified instant life-form. The wedding prioritized the representation of the multispecies community and connected ecosexual to hydrofeminism. It emphasized the need for alliances between artists and scientists to make brine shrimp lovable and visible in cyberspace beyond the global brine shrimp farming industry.

https://justynagorowska.com/Cyber-wedding-to-the-brine-shrimp

The discovery of one of the districts of Jelenia Góra (Poland) encapsulates the issues of Polish national memory on a microscale. The district, which once held a concentration camp within its boundaries, is a post-traumatic space. More than 32 families live there today. Studying the visual aspects of both the camps and the modern residential area architecture reveals deep ties between the modern-day landscape and the historical trauma that permeates it. Differences in the architecture of these two periods reveal how the local residents’ identity was being built. The purpose of this project is to ask whether the lack of cues that would connect the modern-day community to the space unique history is laying a false fundament that makes it more difficult to cope with the trauma, or whether, perhaps, it liberates the community from the traumatic memories hegemony, allowing them to reclaim the space and define it as they wish, leaving history behind.

The well’s design is a symbolic exoneration of the negative housing zone.
The water drawn out of the well is natural mineral water with healing powers. Their presence is a perverse sign of changeable nature, almost following the pattern of the inhabitants of the district. The well is made of granite (prisoners of the camp worked on the extraction of this stone), and at the same time it is the principal ingredient of mineral water.

Work shows the area from 1944 (during the existence of the concentration camp) and images of the district of the “Fampa” at Wojewódzka Street in 2018.

https://www.jagodakwiatkowska.pl/

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